What benefits do employees really want?

Posted by Jac Humphreys 23/07/2018


In today's market, an exciting benefits package is essential for both attracting and retaining top talent, and it has even become a major factor in whether a job offer is accepted or declined. But with all the yoga classes and pool tables out there, what do people actually want?

Getting quirky

A lot of the over-the-top perks you see from huge companies such as Apple or Google, like having your own masseuse or a pod to nap in, cost nothing to them in the grand scheme of things. And while there's no doubt that unique perks are a great selling point, in the era of millennials and tech start-ups these benefits have become commonplace at a lot of other companies that are trying to fit in and stay relevant. In doing so, these perks are no longer as important and there might not be the need to look further from the more basic necessities.


Getting quirky

A shift in priority

When thinking about benefits more practically, as an employee what are you more likely to be attracted by – an office dog and a fireman's pole in the office, or the opportunity to earn a higher salary with more day's holiday? The benefits that are now seen as standard actually hold a lot more weight than one might think and these are ones that are being overlooked by many employers. Ultimately, people show up to work because they like what they do and they like getting paid to do so, and while most employees won't turn down a dinner from a five star restaurant or a ski trip to the Alps, benefits such as personal training and development, bigger bonuses and better work/life balance are actually much more important.


A shift in priority

Back to basics

Speaking about your salary can sometimes be a little taboo. The vast majority of people would like to be earning more if it were possible, but asking for a pay rise, or speaking about it, is often seen as a tricky subject. But when it all boils down, a greater salary is valued far higher as employees are free to spend their earnings as they desire, rather than receiving less in order to cover the cost of these quirky benefits that become redundant after a short while.


Back to basics

A balancing act

An excellent work-life balance is a cherished thing. With so many distractions, it's important that employee's time is both used and split wisely. From an employer's point of view, it is paramount that employees are given enough time to get their job done whilst ensuring they don't become overworked and start to develop resentment. With Sweden testing a 6 hour working day employees are becoming even more aware of the length of time they are spending in the workplace. Therefore, offering any form of flexible working is a huge benefit for both employees and employers. Employees will feel a sense of freedom and trust to work to their own accord (within reason!), and employers will feel content knowing that tasks will be done.


A balancing act

Future potential

Employees need to know that they have opportunities for professional and personal development. It increases the likelihood of loyalty and dedication and if an employee is feeling bored or underappreciated, the office ping pong table doesn't seem that important any more. Having the opportunities for training courses and to learn from your peers, is vitally important in improving an employee's self-worth and value, and provides them with great tools to apply in the workplace, and to add to their own personal portfolio.


Future potential

The full package

Providing the right mix of benefits that are both inexpensive and highly sought can give a competitive edge to businesses that can't afford the more lucrative job perks. Companies need to make sure that they are providing the benefits that employees want – not what they think they want. Benefits are about understating needs and making provisions to help with those needs. After all, a well-rounded package leads to productive employees and demonstrates that employers care about their employees' health, well-being and future potential.

If you're a jobseeker looking for a new position with benefits that really matter, or a client interested in changing your benefits package, we'd like to hear from you. Please either drop us an email on contact@realtimeconsultants.co.uk or call in on 0117 917 1500.

4 Increasingly Popular Development Languages

Posted by Jac Humphreys 31/05/2018


With more and more programming languages being created, there are those that stand out in popularity more so than the rest of them. Here we have a look at four of them, which are becoming increasingly popular amongst developers in 2018.

Rust

Rust is Stack Overflow's most loved development language and was born from a small, personal project by a Mozilla employee. Now it is replacing a lot of C and C++ development due to its efficiency and memory control, giving the high-performance that comes with writing in C, with a compiler that identifies the majority of mistakes before the code even runs. Comparatively, it performs better than JavaScript, Python PHP & Ruby at writing low-level code, whilst being a safe and usable development language. Rust can be difficult to pick up initially, however, once learnt, experienced developers are huge fans of it and its popularity can only continue to increase.

R

The oldest of these four languages, R was designed by statisticians and scientists to make their work easier. It has many of the functions used in data analysis and the statistical algorithms are already implemented as freely distributed libraries. R is completely free and open source, so unlike some of its similar languages, it can be customised, cloned and even redistributed. Its more recent growth can be put down to the increase in the number of big data roles which seem to be becoming even more prevalent. Another advantage of R is that the open source software is upgraded a lot more regularly than others, this being hugely advantageous for statistical development languages and environments.

Go

Envisaged in 2007, Go was released by Google as an open source language in 2009 as a simple alternative to building reliable, dynamic and efficient software. Already well-established at Google, Go is gaining acceptance at many other large organisations due to the stability and structure of that C offers, with the ease of using a dynamic script language. With Go being such a young language, there aren't many libraries for it yet, leaving developers to write them themselves. However, this hasn't stopped a large number of organisations to use it as a way to manipulate data, companies such as the BBC, Facebook and even the UK government.

Kotlin

Kotlin is the youngest of the languages mentioned and has risen in popularity due to its compatibility with the Android platform. Not only can you easily build Android applications with it, it can also be compiled down into JavaScript, making it extremely versatile for both front and back end development. A statically typed language that targets the JVM and JavaScript, Kotlin is looking set to start competing with the more popular new JVM languages such as Clojure and Scala, making it a good option for organisations wanting to gradually improve their code base. This strategy has become popular as it allows them to adopt to the language slowly, gaining fans at global banks, consultancies and app development companies.

Real Time Consultants are always keen to hear from talented developers and software engineers of all levels. So whether you're completely new to software development and are looking for your first position, or you're a senior developer looking to add another language to your portfolio, we would love to hear from you! Please give us a call on 01179 171 500 or drop us an email on contact@rtc.co.uk and one of our consultants will be in touch.